StarTech.com

USB 3.0 / eSATA Dual-Bay Trayless 3.5” SATA III Hard Drive Enclosure with UASP - 2-Bay SATA 6 Gbps Hot-Swap HDD Enclosure

Connect two hot-swappable 3.5" SATA III hard drives to your computer externally through USB 3.0 with UASP or eSATA

Product ID: S352BU33RER

  • Supports SATA III (6 Gbps) and UASP (5 Gbps) for optimal performance
  • Hardware RAID with support for RAID0 / RAID1 / BIG / JBOD
  • Trayless removable HDD slots with drive locks
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  • Compatible with SATA revision I/II/III (1.5/3.0/6.0 Gbps) drives
  • Compatible with USB 3.0/2.0/1.1 (5 Gbps / 480 Mbps / 1.5 Mbps)
  • Front-mounted RAID controller
  • USB 3.0 and eSATA cables included
€ 166,99 EUR exc VAT
€ 203,73 EUR inc VAT

Overview

The S352BU33RER 2-Bay RAID enclosure lets you build an external RAID array with two 3.5” SATA hard drives, and connect to your computer through USB 3.0 or eSATA.

For fast performance and efficient data transfers, the enclosure supports SATA III transfer speeds -- up to 6 Gbps when connected through eSATA. The versatile RAID enclosure can also be connected through USB 3.0, with support for UASP, performing up to 70% faster than conventional USB 3.0 when paired with a UASP-enabled host controller. See our UASP testing results below for further details.

The external RAID enclosure features a hardware RAID controller, supporting JBOD, Spanning, RAID 0, and RAID 1 -- to achieve greater drive capacity, or secure data redundancy. The RAID controller is also front mounted for ease of access when changing your RAID mode.

For fast and easy drive installation and removal, the dual drive enclosure features a convenient trayless system that eliminates having to mount and fasten your drives, saving time and hassle.

To ensure compatibility with your computer system, the S352BU33RER supports all of the leading operating systems, including: Microsoft Windows® (8/7/Vista/XP/Server 2008/Server 2003), Apple® OSX (10.9/10.8/10.7/10.6), Linux, and Google Chrome OS™.

The S352BU33RER is backed by a StarTech.com 2-year warranty and free lifetime technical support.

Improved Performance with UASP

UASP is supported in Windows 8, Mac OSX (10.8 or above), and Linux. In testing, UASP performs with a 70% faster read speed and 40% faster write speed over traditional USB 3.0 at peak performance.

UASP Speed Diagram

At the same peak in testing UASP also shows an 80% reduction in required processor resources.

UASP Speed Diagram

Testing results were obtained using an Intel® Ivy Bridge system, a UASP-enabled StarTech.com Enclosure, and a SATA III solid state drive.

The StarTech.com Advantage

  • Versatile connectivity options, through either USB or eSATA
  • Maximize performance, with file transfer speeds up to 6Gbps using eSATA
  • Achieve greater drive capacity or secure data redundancy with a built-in hardware RAID controller

Applications

Build an external RAID 1 array for data redundancy, to protect against drive failure when working with important data

Externally work with very large files securely in video editing or photography applications

Quickly transfer large data files from your computer to a secure external RAID enclosure

Technical Specifications

Warranty Information
Warranty 2 Years
Hardware
Bus Type USB 3.0
Chipset ID JMicron - JMS562
Compatible Drive Types SATA
Drive Installation Removable
Drive Size 3.5in
Fan Bearing Type Sleeve Bearing
Fan(s) Yes
Fans 1 - 70 mm
Front Door Key Lock Yes
Interface USB 3.0 & eSATA
Number of Drives 2
Number of internal 3.5 inch bays 2
Performance
Air Flow Rate 12.72 CFM
Hot Swap Capability Yes
Max Drive Capacity Currently tested with up to 4TB 7200 RPM 3.5" hard drives per bay (8TB total) and 2TB 5900 RPM 2.5" hard drives (2TB total)
Maximum Data Transfer Rate 6 Gbps
Noise Level 26.24 dBa
Port Multiplier Yes
RAID Yes
Supported RAID Modes BIG (Spanning or Concatenation)
JBOD - (Just a Bunch of Disks)
RAID 0 (Striped Disks)
RAID 1 (Mirrored Disks)
Type and Rate USB 3.0 - 5 Gbit/s
SATA III (6 Gbps)
UASP Support Yes
Connector(s)
Drive Connectors 2 - SATA Data & Power Combo (7+15 pin) Receptacle
Host Connectors 1 - USB Type-B (9 pin) USB 3.0 Female
1 - eSATA (7 pin, Data) Female
Software
OS Compatibility OS independent; No software or drivers required
Indicators
LED Indicators 1 - HDD 1 Activity
1 - HDD 2 Activity
1 - RAID LED
Power
Input Voltage 110V-240V AC
Output Current 3 A
Output Voltage 12 DC
Power Consumption (In Watts) 36
Power Source AC Adapter Included
Environmental
Humidity 20%RH~80%RH
Operating Temperature 5°C to 35°C (41°F to 95°F)
Storage Temperature -20°C to 50°C (-4°F to 122°F)
Physical Characteristics
Product Height 118 mm [4.6 in]
Product Length 215 mm [8.5 in]
Product Weight 1834 g [64.7 oz]
Product Width 130 mm [5.1 in]
Packaging Information
Shipping (Package) Weight 2.9 kg [6.3 lb]
What's in the Box
Included in Package 1 - USB 3.0/eSATA Dual 3.5" SATA HDD Trayless Enclosure
1 - eSATA Cable
1 - USB 3.0 Cable
2 - Drive Bay Keys
1 - Universal Power Adapter (NA/UK/EU)
1 - Instruction manual
Supports any operating system.
No additional drivers or software required.

Certifications

Accessories

Product Support

Frequently Asked Questions

Before You Buy

To determine if your hard drive will work in this enclosure, on the product page, click the Technical Specifications tab, and do the following:

  • Make sure that the enclosure supports the storage size of your hard drive. If the storage size of your hard drive is larger than what the enclosure was tested with, the hard drive will likely still work with the enclosure.
  • Confirm that your hard drive uses the same interface type as the enclosure. For example, IDE, SATA, or M.2.
  • Make sure that the enclosure supports the physical size of your hard drive, such as 2.5 inches or 3.5 inches.
  • Make sure that the enclosure supports the height of your hard drive. For example, 9 mm or 15 mm.
  • Verify that the power consumption of your hard drive doesn’t exceed the power output of the enclosure. If you’re using multiple hard drives, make sure that the combined power consumption of all of the hard drives doesn’t exceed the power output of the enclosure.

Note: Not all StarTech.com devices support each of the RAID modes described below. For more information on the RAID modes that your device supports, refer to the manual or the StarTech.com product page.

Redundant Array of Independent Disks (RAID) is a virtual disk technology that combines multiple physical drives into one unit. RAID can create redundancy, improve performance, or do both.

RAID should not be considered a replacement for backing up your data. If critical data is going onto a RAID array, it should be backed up to another physical drive or logical set of drives.

The following are terms that are normally used in connection with RAID:

  • Striping: data is split between multiple disks.
  • Mirroring: data is mirrored between multiple disks.
  • Parity: also referred to as a checksum. Parity is a calculated value used to mathematically rebuild data.

Different RAID levels exist for different application requirements.

Refer to the following table for the list of RAID modes offered by some StarTech.com products:

RAID mode Description Operation Advantages Disadvantages Recovery
RAID 0 Striped disks Data is split evenly between two or more disks. Large size and the fastest speed. No redundancy. If one or more drives fails, this results in array failure.
RAID 1 Mirrored disks Two or more drives have identical data on them. A single drive failure will not result in data loss. Speed and size is limited by the slowest and smallest disk. Only one drive is needed for recovery.
RAID 3 Striped set with dedicated parity Data is split evenly between two or more disks, plus a dedicated drive for parity storage. High speeds for sequential read/write operations. Poor performance for multiple simultaneous instructions. A single drive failure will rebuild.
RAID 5 Striped disks with distributed parity Data is split evenly between three or more disks. Parity is split between disks. Large size, fast speed, and redundancy. The total array size is reduced by parity. A single drive failure will rebuild.
RAID 10 1+0; Striped set of Mirrored Subset Four or more drives are made into two mirrors that are striped. Larger size and higher speed than RAID-1, and more redundancy than RAID-0. No parity. Only one drive in a mirrored set can fail.
JBOD Just a Bunch Of Disks Any number of drives are accessed independently by the operating system. Software RAID modes can be used. Hardware RAID may have better performance. N/A
Big Spanning or Concatenation Data is written on one drive until it is full, and then the next drive(s) until it or they are full. Creates a very large and simple array.

No redundancy.

N/A
Clone RAID 1 + Spare

Two drives have identical data, plus one drive is used for rebuilding in case of a primary array failure.

Seamless operation when one drive fails in a RAID-1 array. Spare drive is not accessible to the user. Only one drive is needed for recovery.

 

How to

To confirm that the Mac OS detects your USB device, complete the following:

  1. Click the Apple icon.
  2. Click About This Mac.
  3. Click More Info or System Report.
  4. Under the appropriate heading, confirm that your USB device is listed and that there isn't an error. For example, a network card would be under Ethernet Cards.

You may need to refresh the System Information page after you plug in your device.  To do so, press Command R with the System Information page open.

Your USB device is listed according to the name of the chipset. To determine the name of the chipset of your USB device, navigate to www.StarTech.com and look on the Technical Specifications tab for your product.

Troubleshooting

SATA hard drive controllers require a feature called port multiplier to read more than one hard drive per SATA or eSATA port. The port multiplier feature is not standard on many SATA hard drive controllers.

If your computer is only recognizing one of your hard drives, you need to plug the eSATA cable into a SATA controller that includes the port multiplier feature. If none of your current hard drive controllers include this feature, you can add a hard drive controller that does support port multiplier in any available expansion slot (for example, PCI, PCI-Express, PCMCIA, CardBus, or ExpressCard). StarTech.com has hard drive controllers available that support the port multiplier feature. To view the hard drive controllers, click here: http://startech.com/Cards-Adapters/HDD-Controllers/SATA-Cards/?filter_PORTMULTIPLIER=Yes.

If you have a hard drive controller card that does support the port multiplier feature but it is only reading one hard drive at a time, update the drivers of the hard drive controller. To find the most current StarTech.com drivers, click here: http://www.startech.com/Support.

When you troubleshoot issues with a hard drive enclosure, there are some quick tests that you can complete to rule out potential problems. You can test to make sure that the following components are working correctly and are not the source of the issue:

  • Cables
  • Hard drives
  • Hard drive enclosure

To test your setup components, try the following:

  • Use the cables, hard drives, and hard drive enclosure in another setup to see if the problem is with the components or the setup.
  • Use a different cable, hard drive, and hard drive enclosure in your setup to see if the problem persists. Ideally, you should test a component that you know works in another setup.

When you test the hard drive and hard drive enclosure, it is recommended that you do the following:

  • To check Disk Management, press the Windows key + R, type diskmgmt.msc, and press Enter. Check to see if your hard drive is listed.
  • If the hard drive is listed with unallocated space, the hard drive needs to be reformatted. Right-click unallocated and click New Simple Volume. Follow the on-screen instructions to complete the reformatting.​

Note: Formatting a hard drive erases all of the data on it. Make sure that you back up all of your data before you reformat the hard drive.​

  • If the hard drive is listed as healthy but does not have a drive letter, for example, C:, right-click healthy and click Change Drive Letter and Paths. Click Add, assign a drive letter, and click OK.

Note: A formatted hard drive will not show up in Computer or My Computer until it has a drive letter assigned to it.

In order to rebuild a RAID array, you need to replace a physical drive with an identical drive on the same RAID controller. Although standard RAID levels are generally agreed upon throughout the industry, the implementation varies between manufacturers. RAID arrays are typically not accessible when they are moved to another controller, and data may be unrecoverable if the drives are out of order or have been formatted or accessed by another RAID controller.

If a RAID controller has failed, you should get the exact same model of RAID controller.  

Note: If a drive or drives were damaged, it is possible that the RAID array may be permanently unrecoverable.

RAID should not be considered a replacement for backing up your data. If critical data is going onto a RAID array, you should back up the data on another physical drive or logical set of drives.

Rebuild a RAID array

With the following RAID modes, recovery is possible using the same StarTech.com product. Refer to the following table for the appropriate method to use to recover your RAID array.

RAID mode Max # of failed drives Procedure
RAID 1 Only one drive is needed for recovery.
  1. Determine which drive is operational by using the RAID management utility (if available) or test each drive individually on a different hard drive controller (for example, a hard drive docking station or SATA controller).

  2. Replace the failed drive with an identical hard drive.

The array will rebuild and is accessible during the rebuilding process.

RAID 3 Single drive failure will rebuild.
  1. Determine which drive is defective by using the RAID management utility (if available) or with diagnosis LEDs on the controller or enclosure.

  2. Replace with an identical hard drive.

Note: Do not change the order of the drives.

  1. The array may be accessible during the rebuild, but you should let the controller rebuild without interruption so that performance is not compromised.

RAID 5 Single drive failure will rebuild.
  1. Determine which drive is defective by using the RAID management utility (if available) or with diagnosis LEDs on the controller or enclosure.

  2. Replace with an identical hard drive.

Note: Do not change the order of the drives.

  1. The array may be accessible during the rebuild, but you should let the controller rebuild without interruption so that performance is not compromised.

RAID 10 Only one drive in a mirrored set can fail.
  1. Determine which drive is defective by using the RAID management utility (if available) or with diagnosis LEDs on the controller or enclosure.

  2. Replace with an identical hard drive.

Note: Do not change the order of the drives.

  1. The array may be accessible during the rebuild, but you should let the controller rebuild without interruption so that performance is not compromised.